Nanodevice to Help Titrate and Individualize Chemotherapy

A miniature device can measure a patient's blood for methotrexate, a commonly used but potentially toxic cancer drug.

In less than a minute, a miniature device developed at the University of Montreal can measure a patient's blood for methotrexate, a commonly used but potentially toxic cancer drug. Just as accurate and ten times less expensive than equipment currently used in hospitals, this nanoscale device has an optical system that can rapidly gauge the optimal dose of methotrexate a patient needs, while minimizing the drug's adverse effects. The research was led by Jean-François Masson and Joelle Pelletier of the university's Department of Chemistry.

Methotrexate has been used for many years to treat certain cancers, among other diseases, because of its ability to block the enzyme dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). This enzyme is active in the synthesis of DNA precursors and thus promotes the proliferation of cancer cells. "While effective, methotrexate is also highly toxic and can damage the healthy cells of patients, hence the importance of closely monitoring the drug's concentration in the serum of treated individuals to adjust the dosage," Masson explained.

Read the complete article on ScienceDaily: http://bit.ly/130W7kc

Link to the paper in Biosensors and Bioelectronics: http://bit.ly/1zenogo